Sunday, February 4, 2018

Lichens

I've discovered a wonderful place to photograph lichens.  It's the cemetery here in town, where I often go for a walk.  It's sheltered, with good roadways that are kept clear, the ideal place for a brisk winter walk.  And it has a bunch of big old Sugar Maple trees that are often crusted with lichens.  And during our recent mild spell the lichens were very obvious on the tree trunks.

This is my favourite among the big old maples, a truly knotted and gnarled big trunk just above ground level, just covered with green lichens.



These are heavily cropped, but I was surprised at how well my little point-and-shoot focussed on these pictures, held just a few inches from the tree.

Another tree seemed to glow orange, even from a distance.

And here are a couple of close looks at those lichens.

Finally, yet another tree was back to green lichens, looking quite foliose.  Who knows why some trees attract the green species and other trees the orange?  And some trees many more lichens than others?  And then there's the tombstones; that's for another day.  I'm not even going to try and tell you what species these are; lichens are a group of organisms far too complex for me.

In the meantime, it's back to winter here, gentle snow falling most of the weekend.  It's back to a foot deep now, and we have a white world out there. 

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14 comments:

  1. That is quite a batch of lovey lichens.

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  2. Nice lichen pictures. You are having a ball with your little point and shoot! Love the colours.

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  3. Taking a close look is worth it sometimes.

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  4. ok I love photographing cemeteries too, not just for the history but for all the things you find when you explore them. I love the different colours and types of moss that you can find.

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  5. That first tree is so full of character. Lichens seem to favour churchyards and cemeteries for some reason.

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  6. The tree in your first photo is classic old gnarled sugar maple. There's a good field guide (inexpensive as well)to lichens that would be very applicable to your area -- "Lichens of the North Woods" by Joe Walewski.

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  7. Ha, Furry. You have something in common with those trees.

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  8. Beautiful lichen! And I love the snow, too! We only have a couple of inches...send some to me!

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  9. I like the colours!

    We had snow here all day yesterday. Today it's sunny again.

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  10. I find the fungus / algae pretty on the trees as it is on fallen logs . Lovely photos . Lichens on trees are a unique organism because they are actually a symbiotic relationship between two organisms fungus and algae. The fungus grows on the tree and can collect moisture, which the algae needs. The algae, in return, can create food from the energy of the sun, which feeds the fungus. I find it all fascinating . Thanks for sharing , have a good day !

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  11. Pretty amazing looking. They make the trees look ancient.

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